Author: springmagazine

What is Chapter 160D?

A new state law passed in 2019 will change local government planning processes statewide. In May 2019, the N.C. General Assembly passed Senate Bill 355 to combine city and county development statutes and “modernize” local ordinances. It was signed into law by Gov. Roy Cooper in July 2019. Local governments have to change ordinances to comply with the law by July 1 this year. By July 2022, cities and counties statewide also are required to have comprehensive plans or else zoning ordinances cannot be enforced, as required in 160D. The state legislature proposed similar legislation in April 2015 and March 2017. But it was in 2019 that it finally passed. The UNC School of Government states the bill was proposed by the N.C. Bar Association, and that the final version passed was a combination of that bill and another proposed by the N.C. Home Builders Association. Chapter 160D replaces the former 160A that applied to cities and towns and 153A for counties. They were much more detailed, the original writing for which date to 1905 …

Perfume 101 with Jenny Mann

Jenny Mann, the manager and “nose” of The Fragrance Shop, gives The Spring Magazine a rundown on perfume basics. From “The H&R Book of Perfume,” published in 1984, there are three classic fragrance categories for women’s perfumes: Floral, Oriental, Chypre. Floral: Compound of flower scents. “Miss Dior” by Christian Dior is a floral perfume, with two kinds of rose, sandalwood and patchouli.   Oriental: Base of musk and typically using vanilla as an ingredient. Rich and seductive. “Shalimar,” 1925, by Guerlain is the classic Oriental perfume and includes musk, vanilla, incense, jasmine, mandarin orange, iris, rose, among other ingredients. Chypre: Chypre is French for Cyprus and this fragrance family draws inspiration from the Mediterranean island. Built on bergamot, oakmoss and labdanum and meant to evoke the goddess, this category was started in 1917 with the perfume “Chypre” by Coty. For men, the fragrance categories are: Fougere, Oriental, Chypre, and Citrus. Fougere is the French word for “fern,” and perfumes in this family have a woody, mossy scent with sweet top notes. “Boss” by Hugo Boss …

The Fragrance Shop, a family journey of timeless scents

Among the thousands of perfumes lining the shelves at The Fragrance Shop in Carrboro are a perfume that is more than 200 years old, a perfume worn by the empress of France, and an oil that smells exactly like a well-loved lotion of a popular brand. That first perfume, which smells of citrus with a cool, medicinal undertone – or is it overtone, intended to mask body odor in the 18th Century — is called “4711.” The perfume worn by the empress of France in 1860 is called, fittingly, “Imperiale.” It was created by the perfume house Guerlain to soothe her migraines. “Burt’s Bees, we have a scent,” says long-time manager Jenny Mann during a recent visit to the store. And Mann pulls out, as she does, a bottle from tucked behind other bottles that only she remembers. “Someone told me they used to work at Burt’s Bees, right here in Carr Mill Mall,” she says. The bottle smells exactly like Burt’s Bees’ milk and honey lotion. Mann is The Fragrance Shop’s expert “nose,” the …

Durham Fire Department to build $8M new station in South Durham

Durham Fire Department wants to build a new fire and EMS station to the tune of $8 million in South Durham by the city-county line. Instead of renovating the existing fire station in the Parkwood subdivision, the department has staked out a new site at 6919 Herndon Road two miles away, along a rural and residential stretch. On Tuesday morning, the department got the go-ahead from the Board of Adjustment for the project. It was a decision that neighbors in the area seem to have expected. “They drive by here all the time. We see them several times a week,” said Enrique Galvan on Monday as he stood on his front porch, lined with pots of bright red Christ thorn bushes.   Tracey Price, who also lives on Herndon Road, echoed Galvan’s observations. “They come this way anyway,” she said. Durham City bought the land in 2017, paying $700,000 for the 2.2-acre lot, which is assessed for $182,280. The new station is projected to cost $8.02 million. Durham County will be paying for 24.8 percent of …

Government watch: Durham Board of Adjustment, April 27

Stone Bros. & Byrd planning some moves A new mixed-use development appears to be in the works at the long-time downtown garden store Stone Bros. & Byrd. According to an application with the Board of Adjustment, what’s planned for the site at 512 W. Geer St. are tenant spaces at the front of what is currently the store, a residential lobby and structured parking. The Board of Adjustment will hear this matter and others at its monthly meeting at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. When The Spring Magazine reached Stone Bros.’ long-time owner George Davis this week, Davis referred questions to Beacon Street Development of Raleigh. Beacon Street recently built “620 Wade,” a five-story condominiums development located at 620 Wade Ave. in Raleigh. The swanky condos, the web site for which boasts of their 10-foot ceilings and white oak floors, and amenities such as a fitness center and a rooftop terrace, are near the corner with St. Mary Street. The luxury development is located next to the Raleigh Rehabilitation Center, at 616 Wade Ave. A fire station …

Opinion: West Point is for all of Durham

When I think back on my experiences of West Point, it has always felt country, a drive away from the city center, and a place that I don’t really get to most of the time, busy with life and work. In the ‘90s, when I was growing up, it was the place of crowded, sweaty Eno River Festival. In the Aughts, when I was a reporter at The Herald-Sun, it was still a place for the annual crowded, sweaty, fun, Eno River Festival. Crafts, food, the mill, stalls of people selling things. It was so Durham. But in the past year when I’ve gone to West Point to write about the development slated for Black Meadow Ridge, something has changed. North Durham feels smaller, meaner – and during the summer, even rotten. It should feel like a trip to go from the Super Target and Sam’s Club area, where The Herald-Sun’s office used to be. But nowadays, it does not. There is something that has changed in Durham that made going to West Point in …

Neighbors to city council: “Urgent need to correct the zoning”

– Neighbors point out the developer’s proposal is based on the wrong plan from decades ago, highlight the increased flooding on the Eno River. 
– Developer and partners: Environmental impacts have “no relation to the issues presented” and invoke memories of Margaret Nygard.
– Black Meadow Ridge, West Point and water quality.

“I am here to impress upon you the urgent need to correct the zoning of Black Meadow Ridge,” said Arienne Cheek…

Blog post: Impeachment articles have been filed against Joe Biden. What happened in 2016 with Hunter Biden and the Ukrainian prosecutor who was fired?

One day after Joe Biden was inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States, he is getting impeached. Marjorie Taylor Greene, a freshman Congresswoman from Georgia, announced Thursday afternoon she had filed the impeachment articles against Biden, making good on a promise she had made on social media. Greene said in her announcement that the action is being taken because of Biden and his son Hunter Biden’s activities in Ukraine, specifically having to do with possibly getting Ukraine’s top prosecutor Viktor Shokin fired in 2016 because he had an active investigation into Burisma, the energy company on whose board Hunter Biden was serving. “President Joe Biden is unfit to hold the office of the Presidency. His pattern of abuse of power as President Obama’s Vice President is lengthy and disturbing. President Biden has demonstrated that he will do whatever it takes to bail out his son, Hunter, and line his family’s pockets with cash from corrupt foreign energy companies,” the news release stated. “President Biden is even on tape admitting to a quid pro …

The music of the Ciompi Quartet

On a recent bright winter day, the members of the Ciompi Quartet gathered at Duke University to play. Inside the airy concert hall space of Baldwin Auditorium, the quartet started, stopped, and tweaked the way they played. An audio technician sat to the side with a laptop and recording equipment for the session. Negotiations abounded. Because of coronavirus restrictions, the group played with their masks on. And then there were the discussions with the composers, both in person and over Zoom, on how to best approach their pieces. The four pieces were by students in Duke’s Music Department. The music was challenging, abstract, moody, with discordant melodies, full of feelings of disconnection and isolation. The music uncomfortably heightened what was going on in the world. One of the pieces was even called, “Disconnected.” After one successful “take,” viola player Jonathan Bagg asked, “How did that sound to you, James?” The composer, himself taken aback by the beauty of the quartet’s playing, had to snap back to reality before responding, “That was great. Thank you.” Despite …